My studio practice is an investigation of the domestic narrative, suburban psychology, and the home/house prototype. Recontextualized household objects illustrate the complexities and contradictions evident throughout domestic, American ideals. Through manipulation of form and function, I challenge preconceived notions of comfort and care that metaphorically reflect the goings on in and outside of the home.  

 

My studio practice is an investigation of the domestic narrative, notions of suburbia, and the home/house stereotype.  Personal experiences and community observation fuel my decision making process; using common household objects to illustrate what happens in and outside of the home. My work scrutinizes domestic paradoxes by showcasing the tension between the recognizable and the unfamiliar - resulting in obscured everyday objects.   

 

Works focused within the home -- brooms, bedding -- highlight the parallels of home maintenance and self maintenance. Exaggeration in form and functional impracticality speak to the connections that people have with each other, to the physical house structure, and with themselves. With reimagined functions and materials, these objects invite contemplation -- offering rich metaphorical interpretations that reflect the viewer’s interpersonal, domestic experiences. 

 

Works focused outside of the home question the ‘public,’ and often deceptive signifiers of a healthy, or unhealthy, household. Icons of suburbia --“For Sale” signs, picket fences -- capture the evolving nature of domesticity; and in the same gesture, raise the question for who and what for? For who would this place cater to? How would they navigate the complexities of home life? What purpose do these objects serve when presented as a challenge?